Browse Items (6 total)

  • Collection: [1899] George Routledge & Sons Ltd. Reprint, Version 2

Illustration on Page 436a of the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Alice Telling Ellen of Her Illness

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This illustration, appearing on page 436a of the [1899] George Routledge and Sons edition, depicts Alice and Ellen holding hands as Alice tells Ellen that she is terminally ill. Alice sits with one arm wrapped around Ellen as Ellen stands next to her looking down sadly. A large cabinet stands behind the two . A caption below the illustration quotes a sentence from page 436 of the text and reads, "Alice held her and looked sadly for a minute into the woebegone little face, then clasped her close and kissed her again and again."

Subjects: Alice Telling Ellen of Her Illness, Ellen, Alice

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Identifier: 3DES_33_436a

Illustration on Page 388b of the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Aunt Fortune Chasing Timothy the Bull

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This illustration, appearing on page 388b of the [1899] George Routledge and Sons edition, depicts Aunt Fortune holding a bean pole as she chases her bull, Timothy. She stands among several waist-high bushes as Ellen watches her from behind the plants. Aunt Fortune is dressed in a yellow and brown dress and leans forward as if to charge toward the bull. There is a caption below the illustration from page 389 which reads, "Miss Fortune, however, feared the face of neither man nor beast. She pulled up a bean pole and made such a show of fight, that Timothy, after look at her a little, fairly turned tail."

Subjects: Aunt Fortune Chasing Timothy, Aunt Fortune, Ellen

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Identifier: 3DES_33_388b

Illustration on Page 272b of the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Ellen Meeting John

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This illustration, appearing on page 272b of the [1899] George Routledge and Sons Edition, depicts Alice introducing Ellen to her brother John for the first time. A painting hangs behind the trio and Captain Perry, Alice's cat, wraps himself around John's leg as John leans over Ellen to shake her hand. A caption below the illustration quotes a sentence from page 273 of the text. Alice and Ellen, dressed in brightly colored dresses, provide a contrast to John, who is dressed in all black. John's posture as he leans down to kiss Ellen, gives him a position of dominance as Ellen looks up at him and allows him to take her hand. Alice, positioned demurely behind Ellen, looks down at Ellen, so that both Alice and John, who have recently immigrated from England to America, look down on her. The positions of the trio suggest a superiority of the English and an inferiority of Ellen, who represents American nationality. At the same time, the intimate act that is about to take place in this scene, seems to suggest an important intimacy between America and its colonizer.

Subjects: Meeting John, Ellen, John, Alice

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Identifier: 3DES_33_272b

Illustration on Page 212a of the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Mr. Van Brunt Visiting Ellen at her Sickbed

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This illustration, appearing on page 212a of the [1899] George Routledge and Sons edition, depicts a pale Ellen, sick in bed, as she kisses Mr. Van Brunt's hand. Mr. Van Brunt, dressed in a long green coat and pants with a buttoned orange shirt, stands next to Ellen's bed holding a hymn book in one hand as Ellen kisses the other. A caption below the illustration quotes a short passage from page 212. The illustration embodies the ideas of sentimentalism, which utilizes emotion to affect ideas of morality. Ellen, who has just expressed her desire for Mr. Van Brunt to become one of the "fold of Christ's people," appeals to Mr. Van Brunt (and the viewer of the illustration) through a display of emotional affection. The presence of the hymn book foreshadows Mr. Van Brunt's eventual devotion to Christianity.

Subjects: Ellen’s Sickbed, Ellen, Mr. Van Brunt

Identifier: 3DES_33_212a

Illustration on Page 98b of the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Ellen at the Spout

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This illustration, appearing on page 98b of the [1899] George Routledge and Sons reprint, depicts Ellen attempting to wash at a spout behind her Aunt Fortune's home. Ellen leans over a trough, unsuccessfully attempting to catch water in her hands. A barn stands behind Ellen as several white birds circle above it, and her bright red dress stands out against the lush green hills and trees that extend into the background behind her. A caption below the illustration quotes a passage from page 90 reads, "'But what shall I do without a basin?' thought Ellen; 'I can't catch any water in my hands, it runs too fast.'" Ellen's obvious discomfort in nature is highlighted by her failed attempt to catch the water, but the openness of the hills behind her suggests an opportunity for discovery. An image of the spout first appeared in volume 1 of the 1853 George Palmer Putnam Edition (see 11CIA).

Subjects: The Spout, Ellen

Identifier: 3DES_33_98b

Frontispiece to the [1899] George Routledge & Sons, Ltd. Reprint, Depicting Ellen and M. Muller

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This illustration, appearing as the frontispiece to the [1899] George Routledge and Sons edition, depicts Ellen returning a mosaic, a "piece of pietra-dura work," to M. Muller, a Swiss man and friend of Ellen's uncle Lindsay. A caption below the illustration quotes a sentence from page 532 and reads, "'Tenez, monsieur!' said Ellen, blushing, but smiling, and tendering back the mosaic." Ellen, who is described in the caption as "blushing, but smiling" is turned away from the reader, making it impossible for the viewer of this illustration to confirm the caption's suggestion. During the scene on page 532, the reader is told that the mosaic contains an image of Mont Blanc, the highest mountain in the Alps, which is situated between Italy and France. The room where Ellen and M. Muller stand is brightly lit, highlighting the features of M. Muller and Ellen's light blue dress. Their exchange emphasizes the novel's focus on the interaction between people of various cultures and nationalities.

Subjects: Ellen, M. Muller

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Identifier: 3DES_14